When Aspens Quake Look for it at your favorite bookseller - coming Sept. 23rd - page 6

Carolina Style Bar-B-Que Sauce

Carolina Style Bar-B-Que Sauce

This is Carolina style barbecue. This means that it is vinegar and mustard based, as opposed to the ketchup and molasses based sauces of the mid and southwest. The combination of sweet and tangy flavors brings out the absolute best in grilled or smoked pork or chicken.

South Carolina has four distinct regions/styles of BBQ: Vinegar & Pepper, Tomato, Ketchup, and Mustard. Charleston is split between mustard and vinegar.

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Charleston Red Rice

Charleston Red Rice

A true Lowcountry delight, there are nearly as many ways to prepare red rice as there are cooks in Charleston, but the basic recipe remains the same: rice, tomatoes and pork fat simmered together to make delicious! This dish is perfect served with fried seafood or cooked greens. If you don’t eat pork, vegetable fat can be used with good results.

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Shrimp’n Grits

Shrimp’n Grits

Iconic as pineapples in Charleston, this rich dish is a favorite of locals and tourists. There are a million versions today. But, this recipe is as close to what I recall from my youth.

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Frogmore Stew

Frogmore Stew

Similar to the crawfish boils in Louisiana, this “Lowcountry boil” is best served on a newspaper-covered picnic table, eaten with the fingers and shared with family and friends.

Also known as Beaufort Stew, some claim that this one-pot dish (essentially a seasoned mixture of fresh shrimp, newly shucked yellow corn, sausage and potatoes) best represents the essential simplicity of Lowcountry cuisine. According to the South Carolina Encyclopedia, Frogmore Stew originated in the Frogmore community on St. Helena Island near Beaufort, but the truth is that Frogmore Stew exists throughout the coastal regions of the south.

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Hummingbird Cake

Hummingbird Cake

Southerners have been making versions of this cake for decades, calling it different names, like Nothing Left Cake, Cake That Won’t (or Doesn’t) Last, Granny’s Best Cake and Jamaican Cake. The name “Hummingbird Cake” probably comes from the cake’s roots as a Jamaican banana cake; the swallow-tail hummingbird is the national bird of Jamaica. So, you could think of this cake as the love child of Jamaica (with its mashed bananas and pineapple) and the American South (with its pecans and cream cheese frosting).

Adapted from a recipe by Mrs. L.H. Wiggins (originally printed in “Southern Living,” Feb. 1978)

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Benne Wafers

Benne Wafers

Unique to the Lowcountry since Colonial times, Benne (the Bantu word for sesame) was brought to America from East Africa in the 17th century during the slave trade era. Probably the oldest crop grown for its mild, nut-like taste, this versatile annual herb was planted extensively throughout the South.

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My travel style!

In case your are curious as to how I like to travel… check out my video from my recent trip to Africa!

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Cover Art

Cover Art

While the betas are doing their jobs, I’m checking out cover artist!

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Beta Reading!

Beta Reading!

Well kids… its in the hands of my beta readers now!  Thank you to them all for all the support and their work!  Can’t wait to hear their suggestions.!

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The Trees Beyond the Grass

The Trees Beyond the Grass

COMING SOON!  Available on Amazon.com Sept. 23rd!

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